The Lancer Restaurant and its grapes

Lancer

I no sooner post a TBT of the Lancer Restaurant on the Mt. Rose highway, than my buddy ol’ Chuk Thomas gives me the authentic recipe for the famous Lancer grapes, the highlight (or at least one highlight) of their menu.

Both images are c. 1965; the Lancer, which prior to that name was the Mesa, burned on July 30, 1971. Yeah, I know, it’s “Chuck,” but Chuk is an old nickname. Here’s the recipe, somebody lemme know how it came out!LancerGrapes

Springing into fall, and Greyhound’s nose-thumbing of the Truckee River

GreyhoundWe have a job to do when the new Reno City Council is sworn in. Sit alongside me now on a rock on the Truckee where Walter Van Tilburg Clark penned his Sweet Promised Land of Nevada passage from the City of Trembling Leaves in 1945 and look across the stream at the Greyhound bus station.

Time was, the station was downtown, next to the Santa Fe on Lake Street – the buses left the station through an alley. “We’d like to abandon that alley so we can join our properties,” said Harrah’s Club. “Fine with us,” said Greyhound, “Just find us another site, downtown.”   A site was located between West First and Second Streets, facing Stevenson Street. The community went into high dudgeon – “You’re going to put a bus station there, along the river?” “But it will be a beautiful bus station,” said the proponents, “An asset to the river – it will be landscaped and attractive.” And so they got permission, a Special Use Permit, I surmise, with the caveat that the bus station must be landscaped and beautiful and all that. And it was, for many years.

Today as I sit on Van Tilburg Clark’s rock staring northwest, the bus station looks like a warehouse that God relegated to a place somewhere northeast of Edwards air base in the Mojave Desert. Our task is to convince our city council, having spent beaucoup civic bucks on the river corridor, to jack up whoever enforces these matters and demand that the bus station be brought up to the landscaping expectations in place when its relocation was approved. (Or, in the alternative, condemn it, but that’s a reach.) Vote early and often next Tuesday, then write the new council to attend to this glitch.

And, wrapping up matters of city government, it should be noted for the Homefinder record that Reno’s popular former city manager Chris Cherches passed away a fortnight ago in Wichita. He just missed meeting his granddaughter, expected any day now by Chris’ daughter Leslie and husband Jay Crouser.

I thank readers for the response on the planned Reno architect series, and learned that the Historic Reno Preservation Society’s ace streetwalker (street-walking tours, that is) Anne Simone is planning a program about one of my favorite architects, Ed Parsons, in the early part of next year. Her work will find its way into this column, with liberal attribution to Anne.

I’m going to hit the beach in Sparks. Have a safe holiday, 1,331 Accident-free Days at Ralston Foods on East Greg, and God bless America!

[2011 notes: During these early-2000 days I was chronicling Ralston Foods’ incredible “injury-free days” readerboard out on East Greg Street – this day apparently at 1,331 days – going on four years – without a time-off injury. Shortly after that an employee fell into a vat of shredded wheat on the packaging line and wound up in Sparks, San Francisco, St. Louis, Bath, (Maine), several soldiers’ barracks in the U.K. and a cruise ship in the Mediterranean. The board went back to 000.

(Sometimes I wrote stuff just to see if anyone was reading the column.)

And no, the shot at Greyhound Bus Lines for letting their building’s landscaping look like hell, and at the City for allowing it to continue, fell on deaf ears, or eyes,, as usual. It looks worse today, April 22, 2011. And now, Sept 2015]]

© RGJ Sept. 1, 2004. Updated, sort of, Sept. 15, 2015

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial comes to the Hollywood Bowl!

HollywoodBowl                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Just testing to see if I can still make this computer work – the photo was taken at the Hollywood Bowl last night. On the stage is the LA Philharmonic, playing John Williams’ score from the movie (Williams, now 83, introduced conductor David Newman on a videotaped segment).ET_moon copy My overall review is that when Elliott rode his bike across the moon in that iconic shot from the movie with E.T. in his basket, causing 17,000 children of all ages to applaud and cheer, that for all the problems on this rock, life is really pretty damn good!